Now Playing Tracks

There’s really a traditional Hollywood style of filmmaking that’s based on the story, and a European style which is more discursive and atmospheric; you can see it in Renoir and Hitchcock. Even in apparently narrative film, the entire narrative exists largely to maneuver two or three scenes into position to maximum effect. The narrative really has only a framing function. It’s a static construction, essentially. The particular scenes which are being nurtured are actually functioning in a lyrical way. They correspond to a lyrical poem rather than a narrative poem. It’s true that action may go on in them, but nonetheless they’re a lyrical description of an overall — and in that sense, static — situation. Hitchcock said of his English films that the central idea was just to present a series of strong scenes, and never mind how the people got from A to B. When he got to America, he found everybody worrying whether the plot was plausible or not, so he had to change his method of constructing a movie.
Raymond Durgnat (via somenotesonfilm)

Sergei Eisenstien

thefilmbiz:

He’s written essays on Film Theory as well as Montage.

Montage is what he’s usually referenced for. Others, such as Kuleshov, have tried to define Montage, but Eisenstien’s viewpoint on it has stuck as the general consensus: “montage is an idea that arises from the collision of independent shots” and “each sequential element is perceived not next to the other, but on top of the other”.

archiemcphee:

Happy Pi Day! Today is 3/14, that special day on which we get to celebrate our favorite mathematical constant and pie, one of our favorite foods. It’s an awesome combination, so let’s start the celebration with 4 awesome Pi pies. Pictured above from top to bottom are:
A Triple Berry Pi Day Pie created by the baking wizards at Pillsbury. (click here for the recipe)
A Winter Squash Birthday Pi Pie made by Barbara at Log Cabin Cooking. This pie was created in honor of Albert Einstein, who was born on March, 14, 1879. (Click here for the recipe) Happy Birthday Albert! Your birthdate is yet another reason you’re so awesome.
A splendid Apple Pi Day Pie via the Seattle PI.
And last, but clearly not least, Jules of Go Jules Go made this mouthwateringly awesome Chocolate Chip-Walnut Tollhouse Pi Pie, which she garnished with a beautiful chocolate-covered bacon Pi symbol, encircled by additional pieces of chocolate-covered bacon, because bacon. (Click here for the recipe)

Because it’s my boys’ birthdays
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Happy Pi Day! Today is 3/14, that special day on which we get to celebrate our favorite mathematical constant and pie, one of our favorite foods. It’s an awesome combination, so let’s start the celebration with 4 awesome Pi pies. Pictured above from top to bottom are:
A Triple Berry Pi Day Pie created by the baking wizards at Pillsbury. (click here for the recipe)
A Winter Squash Birthday Pi Pie made by Barbara at Log Cabin Cooking. This pie was created in honor of Albert Einstein, who was born on March, 14, 1879. (Click here for the recipe) Happy Birthday Albert! Your birthdate is yet another reason you’re so awesome.
A splendid Apple Pi Day Pie via the Seattle PI.
And last, but clearly not least, Jules of Go Jules Go made this mouthwateringly awesome Chocolate Chip-Walnut Tollhouse Pi Pie, which she garnished with a beautiful chocolate-covered bacon Pi symbol, encircled by additional pieces of chocolate-covered bacon, because bacon. (Click here for the recipe)

Because it’s my boys’ birthdays
Zoom Info

archiemcphee:

Happy Pi Day! Today is 3/14, that special day on which we get to celebrate our favorite mathematical constant and pie, one of our favorite foods. It’s an awesome combination, so let’s start the celebration with 4 awesome Pi pies. Pictured above from top to bottom are:

A Triple Berry Pi Day Pie created by the baking wizards at Pillsbury. (click here for the recipe)

A Winter Squash Birthday Pi Pie made by Barbara at Log Cabin Cooking. This pie was created in honor of Albert Einstein, who was born on March, 14, 1879. (Click here for the recipe) Happy Birthday Albert! Your birthdate is yet another reason you’re so awesome.

A splendid Apple Pi Day Pie via the Seattle PI.

And last, but clearly not least, Jules of Go Jules Go made this mouthwateringly awesome Chocolate Chip-Walnut Tollhouse Pi Pie, which she garnished with a beautiful chocolate-covered bacon Pi symbol, encircled by additional pieces of chocolate-covered bacon, because bacon. (Click here for the recipe)

Because it’s my boys’ birthdays

Films for Lent 2014: Hook and Kagemusha

Week 1

The fasting during Lent is never about seeing if you can achieve the discipline. It’s about becoming more like Christ. Both of these movies are about this goal. Praying through these films will both challenge and encourage us to be the saints (Pan) we already are.

In Kagemusha, a rascally thief with no honor becomes an honorable man through the imitation of a shogun. Turns out he looks just like the shogun and is chosen to be a double. Of course he clothes, manners, and speech do not match but over time he becomes a great impersonator. However, the change is more deep: he begins to share the values to truly become a great a ruler. I’ll not spoil the ending here, but there are echoes of “take up your cross and follow me” as the thief continues to serve his master after his death. *available on Netflix

In Hook, we have a man who has forgotten who he is. Robin Williams has settled for corporate life when he is actually Peter Pan. Most of the film is about a man remembering who he always was. Much of discipleship is a recovery of the divinity (theologically, imago dei) that has been covered up and forgotten. *available for rent on Amazon Instant

zacheser:

TEDxTalks. Colin Stokes. In this presentation, Colin Stokes effectively discusses how films suggest ideas about manhood and gender identity and how we should be raising children using the films we watch with them.

[TW: Rape culture]

Why your kids should see the Wizard of Oz & Netflix as a parenting resource

mid0nz:

Low Level Framing in The Reichenbach Fall

So much of TRF is shot with a low level frame close to the ground (without the camera being angled up or down.) In the case of these scenes in TRF, the camera is on a very low tripod.

During the first scene between John and his therapist the camera is low and static as John asks “D’you want to hear me say it?” Near the end of the episode when we return to the session, the therapist is actively trying to get John to say what’s on the tip of his tongue, what he’d wished he’d said to Sherlock. “Say it now,” she commands. He refuses and the camera zooms out over the silence between them.

It’s hella disconcerting because we can’t help but associate it with Sherlock’s point of view on the ground after the fall and with John’s point of view after he’s painfully leveled by the cyclist. 

We’re meant to feel knocked to the ground, to absorb the most painful of blows, to be psychologically concussed. 

We share the point of view of two living dead men, our buried protagonists.

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union